Comfort Zone

Designed by Menkès Shooner Dagenais Letourneux Architectes (MSDL), the new Ericsson Research and Development Centre establishes a collaborative atmosphere for the creatives that inhabit its space.

Menkès Shooner Dagenais Letourneux Architectes, Ericsson Research Centre, Montreal
Ericsson’s new head office is made up of two main volumes connected by a ground floor. Although the towers are similar in volume and in the strict and repetitive spacing of the curtain wall mullions, their envelope design distinguishes them.

Located in the Saint-Laurent borough of Montréal, the 265,330-sq.-ft. corporate campus for technological research and design consists of two office towers connected by an internal courtyard. Sharing the same concentric configuration, the three- and five-storey structures blend open workstations with meeting rooms, conference halls, a library, gym, cafeteria, computer lab, and skylit atrium. Navigating the interior through a maze of staircases, employees are encouraged to collaborate in a setting bathed in consistent natural light.Menkès Shooner Dagenais Letourneux Architectes, Ericsson Research Centre, Montreal

“The individuals working here were previously in a building with secluded office spaces,” says Thu-Nhon Luu, associate architect at MSDL. “Ericsson had a branding and design philosophy for the company, and we helped them to adapt it in this new space. Everyone has access to natural daylight and nobody is left in the dark.”Menkès Shooner Dagenais Letourneux Architectes, Ericsson Research Centre, Montreal

With Scandinavian-esque white and wood tones, unexpected pops of colour, and clean decorative lines, the complex is comfortable despite its comprehensive size. On the ground floor, an Early Childhood Centre accommodates up to 80 infants and young children in five colourful classrooms. Dubbed a “Home Away from Home,” the daycare is thoughtfully designed for its users, with small furniture, luminous globes, soft surfaces, and a playful entrance. “The main corridor was inspired by the way in which children draw houses, with a pitched roof and square body,” says Luu. “It’s meant to feel like you’re walking into a small home.” The classrooms also contain full height windows and wood floors, for a continuation of warmth and natural daylight inside the daycare itself.Menkès Shooner Dagenais Letourneux Architectes, Ericsson Research Centre, Montreal

Outside, the curtain wall towers are glazed in a digital printed pattern for visual interest, while a nearby perforated metal parking structure mimics their texture. The campus also opens onto a lush setting with trees, bushes, and a small pond, helping to establish the complex as a natural oasis within its surrounding industrial landscape.Menkès Shooner Dagenais Letourneux Architectes, Ericsson Research Centre, Montreal

The Centre won a Canadian Interiors Best of Canada Award in 2017. The Awards program commended MSDL for its interior design that embodies a corporate culture focused on openness, comfort, and creativity, and for workspaces that foster innovation and collaboration.


Photography by Stéphane Brügger.

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